21


SoCal resident


Senior at Pomona college


Non-binary (bigender/trans woman)


Mexican (Chicano)/Bolivian


Primary interests: Psychology

(clinical/abnormal, cognitive, positive, social)


Philosophy (Phenomenology, Ontology,

Existentialism, Metaethics)

Feminism
(Power, Care, Sexual Assault advocacy),


Disability (Mental health, Body Denotation)

31st July 2014

Link reblogged from Sexistentialism with 1,400 notes

HOMELESS DISABLED TRANS WOMAN REALLY NEEDS A PLACE TO LIVE →

deerdyke:

Hi, I’m Cheryl. I’m an 18 year old disabled trans woman with an emotionally abusive abusive family that I recently left because they were really close to making me try to kill myself again, and because of that I am now homeless. I’m currently staying with a friend but I don’t know…

FOLLOWERS, ASSEMBLE!!

Tagged: signal boosttrans women in needtrans youth in need

Source: deerdyke

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Katherine with 234 notes

biscuitsandgravyzine:

Biscuits & Gravy Zine
Volume 1: Love, Resilience, Possibilities
Biscuits & Gravy is a zine seeking to uplift and centralize the unique experiences of Southern Black and Brown Femmes in Queer culture. This zine aims to envision what community can look like when Black and Brown Femmes have the space to share our stories, lives, pain, love, and bodies on our own terms.
Biscuits & Gravy is a project grounded in anti-oppression, intentional solidarity, and authentic accountability in recognition of the institutional systems of power and global dominance that furthers white supremacy, colonialism, patriarchy, classism, ableism, anti-blackness, transmisogyny, cultural genocide, and various other forms of marginalization and violence.
The theme of our first issue will be “Love, Resilience, and Possibilities.” In a November 2012 interview, poet, writer, editor and educator Warsan Shire stated, “At the end of the day, it isn’t where I came from. Maybe home is somewhere I’m going and never have been before.”
Let’s envision what home can be. How will we love? How will we persevere? How do we reach a place, a love, a world, for which we have no blueprint. Biscuits & Gravy seeks submissions from Black and Brown Queer Femmes grappling with these questions, desiring transformation. Please submit works up to 1000 words. Submissions can be, but are not limited to:
poetry, fiction, personal stories
photos/selfies
artwork
collages
quotes
music
Please send your submissions for consideration or any questions to biscuitsandgravyzine@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions is August 29th, 2014. Mailed submissions can also be considered.
Edit: Deadline extended!

biscuitsandgravyzine:

Biscuits & Gravy Zine

Volume 1: Love, Resilience, Possibilities

Biscuits & Gravy is a zine seeking to uplift and centralize the unique experiences of Southern Black and Brown Femmes in Queer culture. This zine aims to envision what community can look like when Black and Brown Femmes have the space to share our stories, lives, pain, love, and bodies on our own terms.

Biscuits & Gravy is a project grounded in anti-oppression, intentional solidarity, and authentic accountability in recognition of the institutional systems of power and global dominance that furthers white supremacy, colonialism, patriarchy, classism, ableism, anti-blackness, transmisogyny, cultural genocide, and various other forms of marginalization and violence.

The theme of our first issue will be “Love, Resilience, and Possibilities.” In a November 2012 interview, poet, writer, editor and educator Warsan Shire stated, “At the end of the day, it isn’t where I came from. Maybe home is somewhere I’m going and never have been before.”

Let’s envision what home can be. How will we love? How will we persevere? How do we reach a place, a love, a world, for which we have no blueprint. Biscuits & Gravy seeks submissions from Black and Brown Queer Femmes grappling with these questions, desiring transformation. Please submit works up to 1000 words. Submissions can be, but are not limited to:

  • poetry, fiction, personal stories
  • photos/selfies
  • artwork
  • collages
  • quotes
  • music

Please send your submissions for consideration or any questions to biscuitsandgravyzine@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions is August 29th, 2014. Mailed submissions can also be considered.

Edit: Deadline extended!

Tagged: signal boostsouthern femmesfemmes of color

Source: biscuitsandgravyzine

30th July 2014

Post reblogged from My Steel-Toed Boots are Falling Apart with 1,238 notes

slayboybunny:

men disgust me and i don’t mean that in a silly misandrist tumblr post zinger way I mean that at least 80% of the men I have met say think and do really disgusting shit regularly

yep. especially white fellows

Tagged: not misandry because it feels way too uncomfortable to feel that nowtoo many white women displaying it that feels oddly racistif only because like...white women's security have gotten black men killed sooo cant really feel it any moredefinitely get the misandry thing though.just too much race stuff in it

Source: slayboybunny

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Dear Non-Ace People... with 3,570 notes

ace-muslim:


Happy Eid Mubarak to All

Eid mubarak! May our fasts, prayers, and other acts of worship from this Ramadan be accepted by Allah. May He grant peace and justice in our world. A special shout-out to converts, queer Muslims (including asexual Muslims) and any Muslims who have no Muslim family on this holiday. May it be joyful and spiritually enriching for you.

ace-muslim:

Happy Eid Mubarak to All

Eid mubarak! May our fasts, prayers, and other acts of worship from this Ramadan be accepted by Allah. May He grant peace and justice in our world. A special shout-out to converts, queer Muslims (including asexual Muslims) and any Muslims who have no Muslim family on this holiday. May it be joyful and spiritually enriching for you.

Source: dyo-kai-byunnate

29th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Spoon Theory with 221,855 notes

king-in-yellow:

hopephd:

Seizure First Aid. 

Learn it. Share it. Know it. Use it. 

100% correct medical information on tumblr for once; also consider calling 911 if you don’t know how often the person has seizures and ESPECIALLY if the seizure has lasted 5 minutes or more (which is why the watch is critical)

Tagged: seizurefirst aidsignal boost

Source: hopephd

29th July 2014

Question reblogged from fuck yeah sex education with 158 notes

agarota said: What's the difference between a midwife and a doula?

themidwifeisin:

A doula is a support person who offers emotional, physical, and informational support to people who are pregnant and choosing abortion, adoption, and parenting.  They can coach breathing, rub backs, provide information about medications and procedures, help out at someone’s home during the postpartum period by doing dishes, washing laundry, holding the baby, etc.  They know the labor and birth process front-to-back and know how to help people through it.  They are not medical providers though - they cannot diagnose, prescribe medication, or make medical management decisions.

Certified Nurse Midwives are nurses with specialized Masters training specifically in reproductive health and labor and birth.  They can prescribe medications, do annual exams, insert IUDs, deliver babies, and make medical management decisions.  They often work with doulas in order to provide their patients with the best possible care.  Many midwives were once doulas themselves, and know how to use the same tips and tricks and techniques to support their patients through labor and birth and the postpartum period while also managing their healthcare. 

Certified Nurse Midwives provide the same type of care in hospitals for laboring and delivering patients as Obstetrician Gynecologists and other doctors who delivery babies.  They are able to order epidurals, prescribe pain medications, induce labors, etc. for all low-risk patients.  If a patient has a complication that is outside of the midwife’s experience or scope of practice, the midwife will often work in tandem with a doctor to provide the best care possible.

Tagged: doulamidwifesexual healthpregancy resources

Source: themidwifeisin

29th July 2014

Video reblogged from new wave feminism with 61,472 notes

subtlecluster:

kumaton:

politicalsexkitten:

yukaryote:

Why Guys Like Asian Girls - Anna Akana

Everyone needs to watch this video. Now.

100% on point especially about men thinking that having “yellow fever” is a compliment and we’re supposed to be flattered by it. It’s the #1 way to parade around your blatant racism.

I want to be friends with her!

Magical words spoken so succinctly and eloquently yeaaaaaay!

oh dear god, dying! xD 

But, real talk, kind of spot on (and a weird feel i get around some white guys).

Tagged: yellow fever bullshitwhite supremacyfetishizationplease do not do the thingcr*zy usage

Source: yukaryote

29th July 2014

Link reblogged from From One Survivor to Another with 149 notes

I really hate to ask, but I need your help again. →

fromonesurvivortoanother:

As you may know, a few months ago I made the difficult decision to finally break ties with my abusive family, in particular my mother. This was after I made many attempts, over almost a decade, to make things work between us— despite the ways in which she enabled my long term sexual abuse as a…

FOLLOWERS, ASSEMBLE! LEND YOUR AID!

Tagged: signal boostSIGNAL BOOSTtrans woman in need

28th July 2014

Link reblogged from Queer Muslims with 18 notes

The Balancing Act of Being a Queer Muslim | Maryam Din →

queermuslims:

MONDAY, 28 JULY 2014

When people learn of two particular aspects of my identity usually they’re left a little perplexed and you really can’t miss the look of confusion on their faces as they try and figure out how it makes sense. I identify as a queer Muslim and it is these two parts of my identity that not only causes a lot of confusion, and result in a million and one questions (sometimes even really inappropriate ones), but it is also these aspects in which I face the most intolerance and abuse.

Being a queer Muslim, I tread an interesting line, a balancing act if you will. I face queer-phobia from some sections of the Muslim community and Islamophobia coupled with racism from some sections of the LGBTQ community. This means that I literally have to downplay the importance of my religion in some LGBTQ spaces and also having to downplay my sexuality in some religious spaces. The reason why myself and many people like me who identify both within the LGBTQ community and religious communities feel compelled to do this boils down to safety, physical and mental safety.

But you know what though? It isn’t all doom and gloom. It is also because I identify as queer and Muslim that I feel like I have a completely different outlook on life. You know the saying you can only know what someone’s going through if you walk a mile in their shoes? Well, I find that having such marginalized identities (I tick all of the boxes on the equal opportunities monitoring form - ethnicity, religion, sexuality and disability) allows me to be able to empathise with people’s struggles. This brings me perfectly onto the next bit. It’s because of my sexuality that I am able to be a better Muslim. That sounds so bizarre right? Let me explain. Islam deals with a lot of human rights and social justice issues and it is these aspects along with the socialism that I resonate with the most.

The most recent example I have of this is when a now friend, reached out to me. Let me set the scene a little first. I find that because I am so visible as a queer Muslim a lot of people are quick to criticize me and my ‘life choices’ and particularly question why I am so open. It the idea of not airing your dirty laundry in public. The day I came out to myself, I made a promise that I would never hide myself again. Clearly I took this to an unintended whole new level and now I’m visible from workshops to conferences to national radio.

Coming back to my new friend… She came out to me a few months ago and our later messages articulate perfectly why I am so open and unashamed about who I am. Here’s part of our interaction:


Me: I see my visibility as a duty for others who are not able to be visible to whatever reasons. 
Her: I don’t know how many strangers have messaged you before like i did, probably lots, but now you have proof of it. You being “visible” gave me hope and courage and factored in me feeling less alone. So i will always appreciate that.


Reading that interaction still moves me even now. Visibility in a world which oppresses and marginalizes people is a political act. It is an act which unequivocally says that we are proud to be who we are and more than that, we love ourselves and will be unapologetic in who we are and what we stand for. Visibility says that we will not conform and we will challenge you and the status quo. Visibility, perhaps most importantly, saves lives.


image
 


Maryam Dinis a social activist and graduate in International Relations and Politics who identifies as a Black queer feminist Muslim. She has a passion for visibility and activism within the intersections of gender, sexuality, culture and religion. She blogs at [ 5pillarsand6colours ] 

Tagged: LGBTQlgbtq muslims

27th July 2014

Link reblogged from Queer Muslims with 59 notes

Halifax's first gay-friendly mosque opening this summer →

queermuslims:

Posted: Jul 25, 2014 3:51 PM AT

Nova Scotia’s first gay-friendly mosque is set to open in the next few weeks.

The Halifax Unity Mosque is an expansion of the Toronto Unity Mosque, also called el-Tawhid Juma Circle.

The mosque is a “gender-equal, LGBTI/queer-affirming” place for Muslims to worship, according to its Facebook page. 

'Queer Muslims are having to reclaim space that they may have had in the past.'- Syed Adnan Hussein

Syed Adnan Hussein has been building support for the Halifax Unity Mosque for a while. He found a space this week and hopes to start worship by next month.  

He hopes it will welcome people with a range of sexual identities. Many Muslims live in countries where being gay is a crime. Often, they come to Canada to escape persecution.

Hussein was invited to the Universal Unitarian Church on Halifax’s Inglis Street to talk during Pride. “I was really blown away: the community offered us their space whenever we needed it to run our mosque,” he told CBC.

A safe space for worship

Halifax has five existing mosques.

“I don’t want to feel like I’m usurping other Muslim spaces,” he says.

“If they believe that their community is offering them an inviting, comfortable space, a spiritual space, a space in which they can identify in, I don’t want to mess with that. But for those of us who don’t feel we fit in those spaces, and want a space that affirms and values the ideals we believe in … there should be a space for that, too.”

Syed Adnan Hussain is helping start the Halifax Unity Mosque.

Syed Adnan Hussain is helping start the Halifax Unity Mosque.

He said “queer” covers anyone who doesn’t fit a narrow heterosexual definition. He argues that homophobia was brought into Islam, and isn’t a natural part of it.

“Now, queer Muslims are having to reclaim space that they may have in the past,” he said.

“We know sexuality is not stable. Everyone isn’t the same way during their entire lives. To lock yourself into ‘I am this’ or ‘I am that’ means you’re denying your own capacity for change, for evolution.”

'Heart-shaking' moment of conversion

He’s getting help from Troy Jackson. He grew up in Truro, N.S., and now helps run the Toronto Unity Mosque.

The musician converted to Islam. “When I heard the recitation of the call to prayer, I didn’t know what the words meant, but the tone hit me,” he says.

“For me it was a heart-shaking moment, and I followed that.”

The two men hope others will connect with them on Facebook to get the Halifax Unity Mosque up and running.  

Tagged: LGBTQlgbtq muslimsIslam